Ray Mayeda oral history interview, part 2 of 4, January 7, 2010

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Dublin Core

Description

In October 1949, Ray Mayeda worked at the Civil Censorship until it was dissolved. Then Ray worked at Allied Translator and Interpreter Section (ATIS) as a translator. He translated classified documents into English for a year.

After, Ray went to Okinawa to work for the Civil and Information Department in the military government. He was promoted to Visual Presentation Information Specialist. Ray had many Okinawan people working with him to spread propaganda about democracy in Okinawa. Ray screened movies and documentaries around different towns in Okinawa. Afterward, Ray started renting out regular American films, and his job was to control that.

When Ray did not have work, he found time to visit friends and his siblings. Ray has not seen his sisters and younger brother for 11 years. He reunited with his sisters and brother in Kagoshima and helped them come back to the United States. One of Ray's sisters got married there. After the war, Ray's father returned to Japan.

After serving his time in the occupation, Ray was discharged from the Army and censored telegrams in Osaka. Ray met his wife. His wife was working for the CCD in Tokyo and kept in touch. In March 1950, Ray worked in Okinawa and later returned to Tokyo in October 1951 and married his wife in June 1952.

By 1952, Ray was in Japan for five years, and he returned to the United States with his wife. Ray continued his education at the University of Minnesota, majoring in accounting. He later worked for a CPA firm, and then the Air Force Audit Agency hired him. Later Ray and his family moved to Japan, and Ray audited contracts in various places in Asia.


Format

video/m4v

Language

Identifier

2010OH0988_02_Mayeda

Oral History Item Type Metadata

Date of Birth

1922 Oct 18

Location of Birth

War or Conflict

Branch of Service

Entrance into Service

Nickname

Campaigns/Battles

Citation

Mayeda, Ray: narrator et al., “Ray Mayeda oral history interview, part 2 of 4, January 7, 2010,” Japanese American Military History Collective, accessed May 27, 2024, https://ndajams.omeka.net/items/show/1055661.